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CORBYN'S WOES

D-Day for UK

'What is more alarming? That Corbyn could soon be PM or that the British public cared so little about the feelings and fears of British Jewry that they allowed it to happen?'

Placards at a protest against antisemitism in the UK earlier this month.
Placards at a protest against antisemitism in the UK earlier this month.

LATE last month, the Haifa Magistrate’s Court convicted Islamic cleric Sheikh Raed Salah of incitement to terrorism in connection with a 2017 speech in which he praised an attack on the Temple Mount that claimed the lives of two Israeli police officers.

This is the same Raed Salah who was sentenced to eight months in prison in 2008 for inciting anti-Jewish racism and violence.

And this is the same Raed Salah who in 2011 claimed that Israel was behind 9/11, and who was found by a British court to have promoted the antisemitic blood libel that Jews use the blood of non-Jewish children to make bread in 2007.

In this May 23, 2019 file photo, Jeremy Corbyn, leader of Britain’s opposition Labour Party, gestures after voting in the European elections in London. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)

Why are any of these facts particularly worth noting this week? Because as Britons head to the polls today (Thursday), we need to remember this is the same Raed Salah – the same Raed Salah – who in 2012 was hailed by British Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn as “a very honoured citizen” and “a voice that must be heard”.

Corbyn also invited Salah to have tea with him on the terrace of the House of Commons.

But that’s hardly surprising.

Because this is the same Jeremy Corbyn who has described Hamas and Hezbollah as his friends, the same Jeremy Corbyn who has allowed antisemitism to fester within his party, prompting a number of his own MPs to quit and label him unfit for office, the same Jeremy Corbyn that former chief rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks branded an antisemite, the same Jeremy Corbyn that current Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis urged the British public not to vote for, the same Jeremy Corbyn who attended a wreath-laying ceremony for the terrorists who murdered 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics, the same Jeremy Corbyn who has been accused of associating with Holocaust deniers, the same Jeremy Corbyn who defended an antisemitic mural, the same Jeremy Corbyn who steadfastly refused to apologise to the Jewish community when pressed to do so, the same Jeremy Corbyn who … the list goes on and on and on and on.

And that same Jeremy Corbyn could be British prime minister.

But what is more alarming? That Corbyn could soon be PM or that the British public cared so little about the feelings and fears of the British Jewish community that they allowed it to happen?

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