Major upgrades to Yeshiva Centre
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Major upgrades to Yeshiva Centre

The Yeshiva Centre, in Sydney's east, is receiving a $3 million makeover to improve the integrity and the usability of the site.

Rabbi Dr Dovid Slavin, who has implemented new policies at the Yeshiva College in Sydney.
Rabbi Dr Dovid Slavin, who has implemented new policies at the Yeshiva College in Sydney.

THE Yeshiva Centre is receiving a $3 million makeover to improve the integrity and the usability of the site.

“The first stage of the upgrade will be to improve the integrity of the buildings, install significant safety upgrades and improve the overall flow between buildings,” the Yeshiva Centre’s Rabbi Dr Dovid Slavin told The AJN.

He added that there will also be major developments to the basic infrastructure, including improvements to the roof as well as the electrical and plumbing systems on the campus.

This is the first time since 1955, when the Yeshiva Centre was first built, that the entire property has received an upgrade.

“Any work that’s been done up until now has been simply cosmetic, but now it’s really stripping the building back to the shell and installing a totally new fit out,” Rabbi Slavin explained.

The project is being funded by property magnate Harry Triguboff, who has been a major donor to Yeshiva for several decades.

“I want it to succeed so that we will always have learned Jews in the community,” Triguboff said. “The building was neglected. I want it to be brought up to a good standard and that’s why I spent all the money.”

Triguboff has expressed for several years his view that Yeshiva needs to continue providing rabbis for the community.

“I hope they shall continue to grow. First we fix the school and the synagogue, and then we get the Talmidei chachamim [scholars].”

This is not the first time that Triguboff has spent millions of dollars to help Yeshiva.

When the centre was under severe financial strain and under investigation by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for alleged misuse of government funds, he bought the land to enable the centre to pay its debts.

Work on the campus started in late January, and is expected to be completed within seven months. The school is continuing to operate as the work takes place.

YAEL BRENDER

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